Home

Arm's Reach Cocoon Shadow Stripe Hammock Sleeper

Crescent Womb Infant Safety Bed, Lime

$125.00


Okoa Hammock Baby Sleeper - Rosenberry Rooms

I too am a side sleeper and sometimes fetal position. I have had no issues sleeping this way in my hammock. Actually, I am more comfortable in my hammock side sleeping than on a ground pad. If pressed to camp and having no trees, one can easily set up a lot of hammocks as bivy sacks under their tarps. Most hammock campers on long hikes will take a torso length pad for those nights they might have to use shelters or ground sleep. My system is also pretty light weight; about 20 ounces for hammock/tarp and stakes. UQ and TQ come around the same as my ground set up. I ground dwelled (aka suffered) for 5 nights this year and this will not happen again! I am very glad I decided to “elevate my perspective”. Your article on hammock camping is nicely done. Looking forward to part 3.
CR

I’ve experienced almost all of these discomforts while hammock camping, yet I still prefer hammocks over sleeping on the ground. Why? Because most of these discomforts can be resolved, though some more easily than others. When hung correctly, hammocks offer superior comfort over a range of conditions. Indeed, overall comfort is the number one reason people stick with hammocks, even if they experience one or more of these problems. Comfort is the main reason people pick hammocks in the first place. At all of my hammock presentations, it only takes moments for investigators to convert once they get a chance to lay in a properly hung hammock. However, therein lies two weaknesses for hammock newcomers: getting a perfect pitch and having a guide nearby to coach them.

NPR : Why Hammocks Make Sleep Easier, Deeper

  • Andrew Skurka March 14, 2016 at 7:28 pm #

    There’s no such thing as “the best hammock.” There are a range of options, all optimized for different users and conditions. They will all have tradeoffs, though some sacrifice less than others.

    I have used hammocks from Warbonnet Outdoors most extensively. They are well designed, well built, and relatively user-friendly. I’m sure that other readers will express different opinions.

    Reply
    • John Boston March 14, 2016 at 8:51 pm #

      Any input on lawson hammock sleep system I know it has spreader bars and a zippered entrance with bug net also has a Velcro rain fly. I know I will need a underquilt. Any recommendations on that and also a sleeping pad.

      Reply
  • OneLink Hammock Sleep System by Eagles Nest Outfitters, Inc.

    Any input on lawson hammock sleep system I know it has spreader bars and a zippered entrance with bug net also has a Velcro rain fly. I know I will need a underquilt. Any recommendations on that and also a sleeping pad.

    Cold Butt Syndrome — Whether inside a hammock or sleeping on the ground, you compress the insulation under you. A closed-cell foam pad or self-inflating pad are low-cost solutions to insulate you underneath. Purpose-made under quilts that hang under the hammock ensure fluffy insulation keeps its loft and keeps you warm. Around 70°F (21°C), you’ll start to feel cool beneath you. Depending on the conditions, sometimes a sleeping bag is enough, or maybe a fleece bag liner. I find that when I am warmer underneath me, I stay warmer overall and often need less insulation on top. Fight cold butt syndrome with adequate insulation and don’t rely on a sleeping bag alone.