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Clever insulation for your hammock

WINGONEER Outdoor All Weather Camping Hammock Insulation NylonSleeping Bag, used as blankets,Camping Military Sleeping Insulate Reflect Heat Parcel hammock - Orange

$38.99


Hammock Camping in Cold Weather: A Guide To Staying Warm

Cover: The Warbonnet Wookie underquilt is a full-length bottom insulation for hammocks, specifically built for the Warbonnet Blackbird series. Modifications allow this quilt to be used on other gathered-end hammocks.

I have two sets of top and bottom insulation for my hammock. For warm weather I use an Enlightened Equipment Revelation 30 deg Down top quilt that cost me about $310 if IIRC. My warm weather UQ is an old HG Down 3/4 Length 40 deg. Crowsnest with 1 oz of extra down, now called the Phoenix. It cost me about $140 IIRC about eight years ago. Both keep me warm down to 30 to 35 deg. The above setup is really easy to pack into my 2,500 to 3,000 c.i. packs because being down, they are very easy to compress, especially the Crowsnest. I have found 3/4 length UQ’s sufficient to keep me warm when combined with a sitpad slipped inside my top quilt under my feet.

What's Your Hammock Insulation System

  • Synthetic Insulated Hammocks. If you want a compressible (and breathable) insulation for your hammock, you can build one with integrated insulation, like my PrimaLoft WarmHammock that I based on Risk's design.

    Vick made an insulated hammock with Polarguard 3D. The insulated section is only 24"x78", but he sewed it diagonally onto the hammock body so he doesn't get cold shoulders or hips. The entire insulated hammock weighs only 20 oz including the hammock supports and snakeskins.

    Integral Primaloft insulation on a Speer-type
    (WarmHammock Directions)

    Vick's Polarguard 3D Hammock
    Photo by Vick

  • Down Insulated Hammocks. Down compresses better and weighs less than synthetic insulation, so I wanted to see how down works for an insulated hammock. It actually works better in my opinion - unlike a sheet of synthetic insulation, the down expands to the shape of the container, eliminating all air gaps and compression caused by hammock stretch (unless the bottom shell is too small). Standard pros and cons of the down vs synthetic debate apply.

    I started by making a Down Hammock with ~10 ounces of integrated 900 fill-power down, baffled and darted.

    But I didn't like laying right on the baffle seams and I didn't really think baffles were needed, so I took some down from that hammock to make the DownHammock Version 2, which has 6 oz of 900fp down and insulates from above my head to about my knees. It weighs less than 20 oz for hammock+insulation, and I don't need an underquilt or pad.

    Wentworth made one too - here's his Hammock Forums thread about it.

    Down Hammock v1

    DownHammock v2
    (Directions Here)

    Wentworth's Down-Insulated Hammock
    Photo by Wentworth

DD Underblanket hammock insulation

I have two sets of top and bottom insulation for my hammock. For warm weather I use an Enlightened Equipment Revelation 30 deg Down top quilt that cost me about $310 if IIRC. My warm weather UQ is an old HG Down 3/4 Length 40 deg. Crowsnest with 1 oz of extra down, now called the Phoenix. It cost me about $140 IIRC about eight years ago. Both keep me warm down to 30 to 35 deg. The above setup is really easy to pack into my 2,500 to 3,000 c.i. packs because being down, they are very easy to compress, especially the Crowsnest. I have found 3/4 length UQ’s sufficient to keep me warm when combined with a sitpad slipped inside my top quilt under my feet.

I have two sets of top and bottom insulation for my hammock. For warm weather I use an Enlightened Equipment Revelation 30 deg Down top quilt that cost me about $310 if IIRC. My warm weather UQ is an old HG Down 3/4 Length 40 deg. Crowsnest with 1 oz of extra down, now called the Phoenix. It cost me about $140 IIRC about eight years ago. Both keep me warm down to 30 to 35 deg. The above setup is really easy to pack into my 2,500 to 3,000 c.i. packs because being down, they are very easy to compress, especially the Crowsnest. I have found 3/4 length UQ’s sufficient to keep me warm when combined with a sitpad slipped inside my top quilt under my feet.